The Power Of The Dog dominates the list of winners at BAFTA 2022.

View the list of BAFTA 2022 Award winners.

Denis Villeneuve's sci-fi epic "Dune" received five other honors at the glamorous London presentation, while Jane Campion's gritty Western "The Power of the Dog" won the best director and best picture BAFTAs on Sunday. The Williams sisters' father and tennis teacher were portrayed by Will Smith in the film "King Richard," while British actress Joanna Scanlan won the best actress for playing a widow in the drama "After Love." Benedict Cumberbatch, who starred in "The Power of the Dog," took the best director medal on Campion's behalf the day after she earned the top honor from the Directors Guild of America for her movie about the toxic masculinity of sexually repressed cowboys.


After the ceremony, New Zealander Campion made an appearance via video call and admitted to being "speechless" about winning the UK's best picture award.


Tanya Seghatchian, the film's producer, praised Campion as "a visionary whose route has been paved through the previous 30 years of filmmaking," and paid tribute to him.


The movie is currently a front-runner to win the best movie Oscar at the Oscars, which will be held on March 27 in Los Angeles.


Tributes to Ukraine


Opening the ceremony amid Russia's ongoing war in Ukraine, BAFTA chair Krishnendu Majumdar said the invasion had "shocked the world with images and stories detailing a truly horrific and heartbreaking situation".


European film academies expressed their support for Ukraine and stated that they "share the desire for the return to peace." On the BAFTA red carpet, several celebrities wore blue and yellow badges in support of Ukraine. Cumberbatch said he was "doing all he can" to welcome migrants in response to a British government request.


The Sunday awards were a celebration of freedom of a different type as they were held in person for the first time since the Covid-19 epidemic lockdowns, despite the world's somber atmosphere over Moscow's continuous offensive.


The evening's emcee, Australian actress Rebel Wilson, introduced a singing performance by British actress Emilia Jones, who was competing for the best actress award and played a kid of deaf adults in "CODA."


Emcee for the evening and contender for best actress, Australian actress Rebel Wilson, introduced a singing performance by British actress Emilia Jones, who in "CODA" played a child of deaf elders.


Wilson raised her middle finger and stated, "Fortunately, this is the gesture for (Russian President Vladimir) Putin in all sign languages.


When giving out the award for best director, Andy Serkis made fun of Priti Patel, the British Home Secretary, and how she handled the refugee problem in Ukraine.


All refugees are welcome, but some are more welcome than others, according to Serkis, who called Patel's most recent film "a terrible nightmare."


Dune scoops five


All refugees are welcome, but some are more welcome than others, according to Serkis, who called Patel's most recent film "a terrible nightmare."


Ariana Debose, a US actress and singer who starred in Steven Spielberg's "West Side Story" version, accepted the prize for best-supporting actress while joking with the crowd that "I speak dance better than I speak English."


Troy Kotsur received the award for best supporting actor and accepted it in sign language for his portrayal of the deaf Massachusetts fisherman father of Jones's singing high school student in "Coda."


He made fun of the 60th anniversary of the James Bond film series by joking, "Have you maybe considered a deaf Bond, 008?" in sign language.


Sian Heder, the director of "Coda," received the prize for the best-adapted script and thanked the deaf community for "sharing their stories with me and trusting me."


As he accepted the trophy for "Drive My Car," an adaptation of a short tale by Haruki Murakami, Japanese director Ryusuke Hamaguchi said, "Well, that got to care of my jet lag."


"That is the magic of movies—they transcend language and national boundaries. That is a true example of film's power "said Hamaguchi.


In a nod to moviegoers in the Netflix era, Kenneth Branagh received the Oscar for best British picture for his semi-autobiographical work, "Belfast," which is about racial conflict in Northern Ireland in the late 1960s.


"Salute the streaming revolution, but also the living big screen! May they coexist for a very long time."


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