Campaign rally | Trolls who claim a rally ticket hack "don't know what they're talking about,".

The journalists that spread the news, according to Brad Parscale, "were eager dupes to the deception."

Brad Parscale, the campaign manager for President Donald Trump, denied on Sunday that anti-Trump activists on social media were to blame for the lower-than-anticipated event attendance on Saturday in Tulsa, Oklahoma.


Parscale issued a statement saying that "Leftists and online trolls doing a victory lap, thinking they somehow impacted event attendance, don't know what they're talking about or how our rallies function."


According to social media users on TikTok and Korean pop music lovers, hundreds of thousands of rally tickets may have been signed up for online even though they had no intention of attending, according to reports from news organizations including CNN and The New York Times.


The journalists who broke the news, according to Parscale, "acted unprofessionally and were willing dupes to the deception."


The typical online RSVP process for rallies entails eliminating "bogus numbers, as we did with tens of thousands at the Tulsa rally, in determining our probable attendee pool," according to Trump's campaign manager. We never consider these fake ticket requests when making decisions.


On Monday, Trump tweeted that his campaign had gotten "Almost One Million" requests for tickets to the rally. The BOK Center, the rally's host location, has a capacity of 19,000 seats, therefore the quantity at first raised concerns.


The attendance figure was around 6,200, the Tulsa Fire Department reported on Sunday.


According to Parscale, individuals were discouraged from attending the event because of continuing protests and worries over the spread of Covid-19.


The reality is that many brought their families and children to the event as a result of the false news media's warnings for a week about COVID and demonstrators, as well as recent pictures of American cities on fire, Parscale claimed.


As the number of coronavirus cases in the state keeps rising, public health officials in Oklahoma have strongly advised against hosting a demonstration with large audiences in an indoor setting. Ultimately, the Oklahoma Supreme Court upheld the rally's conduct after dismissing a case that claimed masks and social distance should be mandated. At the demonstration on Saturday, neither social withdrawal nor mask use—both advised by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention—were particularly prevalent.


Because of the coronavirus outbreak, the rally marked Trump's first political campaign in months. In the upcoming weeks, the campaign has scheduled rallies in Florida, Arizona, and North Carolina.


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